Fruits of the weekend, the foxy part

My second project from this past weekend is a Lined Drawstring Bag from In Color Order.

More fat quarters from Jo-Ann’s (the husband picked out the foxes); I didn’t like the two fabrics next to each other enough to use them both on the exterior fabric, so instead of a main fabric and accent on the exterior, I used two pieces of the same fabric, and folded over and topstitched bias tape to hide the seam. I realize that without an accent I didn’t need to cut the main fabric in two pieces, but doing so made it easier to orient myself in the pattern, and also to cut the interfacing to fit.

I used bias tape to make the ties, too – kind of a waste of bias tape, I realize, but I had it to hand and didn’t have any ribbon or enough fabric to make other ties, and I wanted to finish the bag. My first choice would have been orange grosgrain (or orange and green striped!), but white was fine as a runner up.

The nice thing about this pattern is that the raw seams are hidden in the lining.

Stripey the friendly local semiferal wanted to see what I was doing. He was disappointed not to find anything exciting.

It’s a decent size for knitting projects – here it is holding my baby blanket project (in its current state, at least; I’m only about 1.5 skeins in), and I think it would be great for lightweight sweaters.I was pretty pleased with how this turned out – especially that my bias-tape-turned-ribbon meets exactly at each side seam, because I’d been careful with my measuring, and it was nice to know I did it right. If (when) I make this again, I think I would run the channel for the drawstring along the top of the bag, rather than 1.5″ down – I don’t love the frilliness of the top of the bag when cinched shut, and it would make the bag a little bigger. I might also use a lighter weight interfacing? But this is a great project bag pattern, if you want one that closes completely. And you could easily add a pocket to the lining, if you wanted something for notions.

So, this was a fun way to kill a weekend, and I’m hooked. Unfortunately for my wallet, that means I’ve already bought more fabric, and have aspirations of clothing…

IMG_0422This is the yellow canvas from my previous post, which also took up a chunk of Saturday; if it gets done/turns out, I’ll post more about it another time.

Advertisements

Fruits of the weekend, the pink part

So, the fabrics are completely different from the ones in my last post, but I spent my weekend making these:   For today, let me show you the pink box. It’s from a tutorial I found at Sew Like My Mom, and used a couple of fat quarters rescued from the remnants section at Jo-Ann’s. I didn’t laminate the lining, since I wanted it for knitting, not cosmetics, but I did use interfacing to give it some structure – the corduroy is very lightweight and floppy.

(excuse all the lint sticking to the corduroy)

I fudged the size a little, as the remnants section at Jo-Ann’s is not exactly a bastion of fine cutting, and neither piece was quite 21″ when squared. The zipper isn’t set exactly properly – it buckles a little – but it seems to work well enough. 

Lots of space for a shawl project! (Gudrun Johnston’s Mystery KAL.)

The one thing is that I had been looking at a gazillion lined cosmetic bag tutorials online, and I forgot until I was halfway finished that this one, while having some of the clearest instructions, has raw seams. I zigzag-stitched over the edges, but it’s not the prettiest thing in the world.

I also could not figure out where I was supposed to put the pulltab, so that didn’t turn out right and I had to fiddle with it it along the way, including adding a few stitches by hand. Super unattractive, I know, but for a first project I’m good with it.

IMG_0447

If I were to make another one of these, I’d use one of the patterns that hides the raw seams in the lining, but it’s a good size for non-sweater knitting projects, and for about $5 for the materials, I can’t complain.

The 3-D construction of this was interesting, because I have a terrible time visualizing how anything fits together (see: pulltab problems) until I actually have all the materials together in front of me. I can read a pattern a bunch of times, I can even have a photo tutorial walking me through the process, and it won’t make sense until I’m manipulating actual fabric – whether woven or knit. My hope in continuing to knit and sew is that I can learn to “see” these things better in the abstract, rather than having to have the physical object in front of me.

Next time I’ll show you the drawstring bag.