Second day of vacation shopping

My next day in Portland, I went to the bookbuyer’s mecca, Powell’s City of Books (which is a wholly appropriate name). I limited myself to looking at craft books, because I knew that if I just roamed all the stacks and shelves I’d probably never leave. And I was pretty restrained, buying only these:

The book on top is this one:

There were a lot of great vintage “how to sew” books, and I wish I could have taken them all home. Well, I wish I could have taken many more things home, and it was hard even to narrow it down to the four I chose. But I had seen a good review of the vintage book somewhere on the web, so decided to try that one. I have also wanted the Radcliffe book for a while, and when I got to flip through it in person, I liked the look of it.  The fitting book was a “staff pick,” and since there were a gazillion fitting books, that seemed as good a reason as any to choose it (also, it wasn’t a huge hardback book). Finally, there were also a gazillion “intro to photography” books, and I have no idea if this one is supposed to be any good, but agin, flipping through it, I wanted to read this one more than the others.

I also ran into a book signing by rock musician Corey Taylor of Slipknot fame (and Stone Sour, but I’ve only heard of Slipknot), which was kind of fascinating. I walked round one set of bookshelves to find the local news person doing an interview with a camera person in tow; it’s funny how immediately identifiable “TV news person” women’s style is. Lots more makeup than most ordinary people. Soon after an entourage guided him across the floor to where he was going to sign, trailed by a huge long line of people wearing black and tattoos all clutching Taylor’s latest book. One guy kept declaiming loudly about being at the end of the line and how long the line was getting – he was clearly super excited to be there.

After Powell’s I wandered over to an interesting store called Scrap, which is a “donation-based creative reuse store and donation center,” or basically a thrift store for arts and crafts supplies. It’s a great concept, and there was lots of really inexpensive stuff there, as well as a good number of shoppers. But I had forgotten until I got there that I, personally, really hate shopping at thrift stores, so I didn’t find anything I wanted or stick around for long.

I didn’t go to Voodoo Donuts on this trip, but Blue Star was near Scrap, so I treated myself to a Raspberry Rosemary Buttermilk donut, which was one of the best things I’ve ever tasted.

And then on the way back to my hotel I stopped at Pearl Fiber Arts, which is a nice little shop filled mostly with local yarns and fiber, as well as very pretty wooden yarn bowls and ceramic buttons. There was nothing I couldn’t live without, but it was still fun to browse, and the owner was very friendly.

Two more days of craft tourism to go…